Seminole Tribe of Florida Wins Supreme Court Online Sports Betting Case

Listen to this news articleLISTEN TO THIS ARTICLE:

The US Supreme Court has lifted a provisional ban on the Seminole Tribe of Florida's proposal to launch online sports betting throughout the state.

Seminole Tribe Overcomes Legal Obstacles

In 2021, the Seminole Tribe struck an agreement with the Florida government to offer online sports betting services. However, the move faced intense opposition from West Flagler Associates and Bonita-Fort Myers Corp. They claimed that the agreement was in violation of federal laws governing Indian gaming.

An initial ruling by a federal judge supported these companies, thereby halting the Tribe’s sports betting operations. However, in June 2023, a federal appeals court overturned the previous decision, allowing the Seminole Tribe to move forward. The recent Supreme Court ruling further strengthens the Tribe's position and opens the door for online sports betting in Florida.

Even though the Supreme Court's decision is a notable win for the Seminole Tribe, there are still legal obstacles. Pari-mutuel companies have lodged a suit at the Florida Supreme Court, claiming that the sports betting plan violates a 2018 amendment to the state constitution, which required voter approval for casino gambling.

Online Sports Betting Still Facing Several Obstacles

Even with the Supreme Court’s approval, the journey to establishing online sports betting in Florida isn't straightforward. Legal analysts, such as Bob Jarvis, a law professor at Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law, suggest that state-level complications could extend the timeline. Jarvis anticipates it might take up to three years for Florida's legal system to completely resolve the case.

Due to the ongoing legal challenges, and recent delay by the US Supreme Court, the Seminole Tribe has opted not to launch its Hard Rock Bet mobile app. Though legally permitted to do so, the Tribe is being cautious due to the risks resulting from launching the platform too early.

The Supreme Court's decision had prompted questions about the wider ramifications of the case. Justice Brett Kavanaugh issued a separate statement highlighting concerns over whether the compact complies with the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act and issues surrounding equal protection under the law. Meanwhile, during the legal dispute, US Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar issued a response affirming that the Tribe's gambling compact with Florida is in line with the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act and doesn't limit gaming agreements for activities conducted on non-tribal lands.