Wyoming Online Gaming Gathers Further Support and Fees Announced

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There is good news for gambling fans in Wyoming as legislators introduce House Bill 120, which would legalize online casinos in the state.

Representatives Jon Conrad, Robert Davis, Sandy Newsome, and Tom Walters are fronting the bill and it represents the first major step forward since sports betting was legalized in 2021.

Up to Five Licenses Expected to Be Granted

The proposed legislation would see the Wyoming Gaming Commission regulate the industry and award up to five operating licenses. Licenses would have an initial fee of $100,000 and a five-yearly renewal fee of $50,000.

The bill contains a 10% tax on revenue for operators and it also stipulates that $300,000 must be set aside for problem gambling programs. One slightly unusual aspect of House Bill 120 is that it would allow for interstate agreements. This would allow operators in Wyoming to partner with those in other states. This way they can access larger player pools, which will boost the industry’s viability.

Several States Considering Online Gambling Legislation

As Wyoming advances towards legalizing online casinos, a similar trend can be seen across the United States, where states including Illinois, Maryland, and Hawaii are either considering or actively moving towards similar regulatory frameworks for live online casinos.

In Illinois, the legislative body is deliberating on House Bill 2239, which seeks to introduce a structured licensing mechanism for online gaming entities. Maryland is exploring the path to legalization through a public referendum, with advocacy from Sen. Ron Watson. Concurrently, Hawaii is investigating a comprehensive overhaul of its gambling laws via Senate Bill 3376, potentially marking a significant shift from its traditionally anti-gambling stance.

In a related development, Wyoming’s leading online gambling platforms, FanDuel and DraftKings, are contesting the legal status of fantasy sports leagues. This challenge follows the Wyoming Gaming Commission’s decision to classify these leagues as illegal gambling activities, sparking a discussion on whether they should be considered games of skill or chance. Critics suggest that such regulatory measures could restrict competition and limit options for consumers in the burgeoning fantasy sports market.